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Posts for tag: Tonsillitis

By Christopher J Lee, MD
September 02, 2020
Category: ENT Care
Tags: Tonsillitis   Tonsillectomy  
TonsillectomyThe tonsils are two small glands that are found in the back of the throat. They are our body’s first defenses against harmful bacteria and other foreign invaders; however, sometimes even the tonsils can become inflamed and infected. This condition is known as tonsillitis. While dealing with tonsillitis doesn’t require having your tonsils removed, your ENT doctor may recommend getting a tonsillectomy if:
  • You are dealing with seven or more tonsil infections in just one year
  • You have more than five tonsil infections a year for two years in a row
  • You have three infections per year for three years in a row
  • Your infected tonsils are not responding to antibiotics
  • You’re dealing with enlarged tonsils (this can also cause obstructive sleep apnea and issues with breathing while sleeping)
If you or your child are experiencing these symptoms, it’s important to speak with a qualified ENT doctor to find out whether it’s time to consider a tonsillectomy. For many adults, a tonsillectomy is recommended when sleep is affected by inflamed or enlarged tonsils.

What are the symptoms of tonsillitis?

Wondering if you or your child is dealing with a case of tonsillitis? It’s possible if these symptoms appear:
  • A severe sore throat
  • White or yellow patches on the throat and tonsils
  • Swollen, inflamed tonsils
  • Tender, swollen lymph nodes in the neck
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Pain or trouble swallowing
  • Fever
What should I expect from a tonsillectomy?

This procedure is performed in a hospital under general anesthesia, so you or your child will not be awake during the procedure; however, this is a minor procedure, so patients can go home the very same day. A tonsillectomy takes anywhere from 20 minutes to one hour and the area does not require stitches.

After a tonsillectomy, it is important to take ample time to rest and recover, which can take up to one week before returning to normal activities and up to two weeks before returning to physical activity. Your otolaryngologist will provide you with detailed recovery instructions to follow after your surgery.

If your child is dealing with persistent and severe tonsillitis, or if you’re dealing with obstructive sleep apnea, it’s important to consult with your ENT specialist to find out if you or your child’s tonsils need to be removed. Schedule an evaluation today.
By Christopher J Lee, MD
January 15, 2020
Category: Otolaryngology
Tags: Tonsillitis  

When you or a family member presents with a respiratory infection it’s rather difficult to be able to tell which one it is. This is because many of them share similar symptoms. So how do you know whether you are dealing with tonsillitis, the influenza virus, or strep throat? Turning to an otolaryngologist can give you the answers and the relief you’re looking for.

What is tonsillitis?

The two lymph nodes located on both sides of the back of the throat are known as tonsils. They are the body’s first defense against preventing infection; however, even tonsils can become infected and when they do this is known as tonsillitis.

Tonsillitis can happen to anyone but is more common in children and teens. Tonsillitis is contagious, so it can easily spread if you come in contact with someone who is infected. There are three main types of tonsillitis: acute, chronic and recurrent. Most children will develop acute tonsillitis at least once during their lifetime.

What are the symptoms of tonsillitis?

Symptoms of tonsillitis may include:

  • A severe sore throat
  • Trouble or pain with swallowing
  • Hoarseness
  • Earaches
  • Headaches
  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Persistent bad breath
  • Swollen, tender lymph nodes of the neck and jaw
  • Red, swollen tonsils
  • White or yellow spots on the tonsils

Symptoms of acute tonsillitis usually go away within 7-10 days; however, if symptoms keep coming back throughout the year then your child could very well be dealing with recurrent or chronic tonsillitis. It’s important that if symptoms of tonsillitis worsen or return that you see an ENT doctor.

Furthermore, it isn’t always easy to tell whether a sore throat is the result of a cold, tonsillitis or strep throat; however, sore throats caused by colds are usually mild and will get better within a couple of days. This type of sore throat will often be accompanied by other cold symptoms such as a runny nose.

If your sore throat is caused by tonsillitis or strep the pain will be severe and can make it difficult to swallow. Those with tonsillitis may experience pain located in the back of the throat, where the tonsils are located. In order to diagnose a strep throat your doctor will need to swab the back of the throat to look for bacteria.

How is tonsillitis treated?

Acute tonsillitis will go away on its own but rest and home care can go a long way to relieving symptoms; however, if tonsillitis is caused by a bacterial infection such as strep, your doctor will need to prescribe a round of antibiotics.

If your child is dealing with chronic or recurring tonsillitis then you may want to talk with your ear, nose and throat doctor about the benefits of having their tonsils removed (known as a tonsillectomy). This is a simple surgical procedure that can often be performed right in your otolaryngologist’s office.

If your child is dealing with severe throat pain and you’re worried that they could have tonsillitis then call your ENT specialist today for an immediate evaluation.

By Christopher J Lee, MD
February 06, 2018
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Tonsillitis   Throat  

While they tend to be most common in young children, ear infections can affect people of all ages. An ear infection can result from a number of Ear Infections can cause paincauses, and treatment will depend on the severity, location, symptoms and source of the infection. Many ear infections respond to self care and clear up on their own, while others may require treatment and prescription medication from an ear, nose and throat doctor (ENT).

Treating an Ear Infection

The ear is made up of three parts - the outer ear, the middle ear and the inner ear. Infections usually develop in the middle ear and can be caused by either a virus, fungus or bacteria. An ENT will check for fluid buildup and determine whether it is a viral or bacterial infection, which helps to determine what the treatment will be. Viral middle ear infections generally clear up on their own over time, and symptoms can be managed with pain relievers like Advil. If the infection is caused by bacteria, an ENT may prescribe antibiotics to help clear up the infection and prevent the bacteria from proliferating. With severe fluid build up, the middle ear may have to be drained of the excess fluid in order to relieve pressure and allow air to flow through the ear.

Types of Ear Infections

In addition to viral and bacterial infections of the middle ear, another common type of ear infection is swimmer's ear, which affects the ear canal in the outer ear from excess water buildup which can lead to bacterial growth in the lining of the ear. Swimmer's ear (otitis externa) is usually treated with medicated drops. In rare cases, an ear infection can be caused by a fungal infection, in which case antifungal medications may be prescribed. Steroids are also sometimes used to help reduce inflammation.

By Christopher J Lee, MD
January 02, 2018
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Tonsillitis   Throat  

An occasional sore throat from a bout with the flu, or an afternoon of enthusiastically cheering for a beloved team at a sporting event can happen to anyone. Small school-aged children, who are constantly exposed to germs and bacteria through their Checking the tonsils for infectionclassmates, are more prone to suffer from chronic sore throats and inflammation of the tonsils (tonsillitis). Tonsillitis is a common childhood illness, and is generally rare in adulthood.

What Causes Tonsillitis?

Like colds and the flu, most cases of tonsillitis are caused by a viral infection. However, they can also be caused by bacteria. Viral and bacterial infections are treated differently, and therefore require diagnosis and treatment from an ear, nose and throat doctor (ENT).

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Tonsillitis?

  • Sore throat/pain and difficulty eating and swallowing

  • Redness and swelling of the tonsils

  • Tender and swollen glands

  • White or yellow spots on the tongue or tonsils

  • Fever

  • Bad breath

  • Raspy voice

  • Headache

  • Neck stiffness

  • Stomachache

  • Drooling (when swallowing becomes too painful)
     

Parents should schedule an appointment with an ENT specialist if pain and symptoms do not improve in 24 - 48 hours.

How is Tonsillitis Treated?

Treatment depends on the source of the infection. If caused by a viral infection, treatment may be similar to a cold or flu with over the counter pain and fever medication and rest. If the source is a bacterial infection, an ENT doctor may prescribe antibiotics. Every case should be evaluated and treated by an ear, nose and throat specialist to make sure that the infection clears up properly.

Will my Child Need to Have the Tonsils Removed (Tonsillectomy)?

Tonsillectomies are generally used as a last resort in rare cases where the condition has become chronic and does not respond to medication and conservative treatment.

Is Tonsillitis Preventable?

The same measures that protect children from cold and flu can be used to help reduce their chances of catching viral tonsillitis from a friend or classmate at school or in day care. Covering the mouth when coughing and sneezing, frequently washing the hands and avoiding close contact with sick classmates can help. Keeping children home from school or day care until they are feeling better can help reduce the spread of germs.