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Posts for tag: Sinusitis

By Christopher J Lee, MD
August 19, 2019
Category: ENT
Tags: Sinusitis   Nose   Rhinoplasty  

While a nose job may seem purely cosmetic it actually offers health benefits, as well.

When we hear the words “nose job” we automatically think about the cosmetic enhancement that many people want to improve the shape and rhinoplatsyoverall appearance of their nose; however, there is more than meets the eye when it comes to a rhinoplasty. In fact, this procedure isn’t always cosmetic. Sometimes people need a rhinoplasty to improve their health. Find out when a rhinoplasty may be a necessity rather than just a cosmetic treatment.

Medical Reasons for a Rhinoplasty

One condition that may warrant getting a rhinoplasty is a birth defect known as a cleft lip or cleft palate. This congenital problem can make it challenging for children to eat or get the nutrients they require to grow up big and strong. Because of this, a rhinoplasty is often recommended by an otolaryngologist to correct the defect.

Of course, there are a multitude of conditions and injuries that may require rhinoplasty treatment. If someone has chronic nasal inflammation due to allergies and has severe breathing issues then a rhinoplasty may be the right procedure to improve their breathing.

Injuries or trauma to the nose (e.g. a broken nose) may also necessitate a rhinoplasty to correct the deformation.

Getting Rhinoplasty

Of course, no matter whether this procedure is cosmetic or medically necessary, there are two ways to perform this procedure: an open and a closed rhinoplasty. An open rhinoplasty is when the ENT doctor cuts into the septum to restructure the nose. When an incision is made into the nostrils and performed here this procedure is known as a closed rhinoplasty.

Whether you get an open or closed rhinoplasty will depend on several factors including the goals behind your treatment, any injuries or conditions you want to treat, and the thickness of the skin that we will be working on.

If you want to find out more about whether a rhinoplasty may alleviate your breathing problems then it’s time to talk to an ENT expert who can examine your nose and determine whether you are an ideal candidate.

By Christopher J Lee, MD
April 29, 2019
Category: ENT Care
Tags: Sinusitis   Sinus Surgery  

Do you find yourself dealing with persistent sinus infections? Have nasal congestion and facial pressure become the norm? If so, then it’s time to turn to an otolaryngologist who can provide you with the relief that you need! While acute sinusitis is usually nothing to worry about and will go away fully after a few weeks of treatment, chronic sinusitis often needs a more proactive solution. If you have been battling a sinus infection for over 12 weeks and it’s not responding to treatment, then it’s time to consider other treatment options. Read on to learn more!

How to Treat Chronic Sinusitis

One of the ways to treat chronic nasal inflammation and blockages is through a simple endoscopic sinus procedure. Unlike traditional surgery, this procedure is minimally invasive and doesn’t require major incisions or removal of bone or tissue.

While this procedure isn’t necessary for patients dealing with acute bouts of sinusitis, if you are someone dealing with a true chronic form of sinusitis, then it might be time to consider endoscopic sinus surgery.

When you come in for a consultation, an ENT doctor will perform a physical exam and talk to you about your symptoms. Common symptoms of chronic sinusitis include,

  • Nasal drainage
  • Nasal obstruction and congestion
  • Facial pressure or pain
  • Post-nasal drip
  • Frequent headaches
  • Reduced smell or taste

Along with a physical exam, an otolaryngologist will insert an endoscope (a small tube with a camera) into the nostrils to look for drainage, blockages, or signs of infection or inflammation. Sometimes a CT scan is necessary to diagnose your infection.

When it comes to treating chronic sinusitis, your doctor will first turn to non-surgical treatment options like prescription steroids, antibiotics, nasal sprays, or allergy treatments (e.g. antihistamines).

If these treatments aren’t giving you the symptom relief that you need, then we will talk to you about whether minimally invasive sinus surgery is the right way to treat your chronic sinus symptoms.

How Minimally Invasive Sinus Surgery Works

During this procedure, an ENT specialist will insert an endoscope into the blocked or inflamed nostril and guide it gently through the sinuses. There are different methods involved in this type of sinus surgery. Sometimes at the end of the endoscope is a camera, which allows us to carefully remove enlarged tissue to improve breathing. Any pus or signs of infection are also drained out. Once this procedure is performed, certain medications are prescribed for long-term management.

Balloon sinuplasty has become another popular minimally invasive sinus procedure because it does not require any tissue removal. Instead of a camera at the end of the endoscope, there is a deflated balloon that is inflated once it’s placed into the blocked or inflamed nasal cavity. As the balloon is inflated, it opens up the blocked passageway so it can properly drain. Then the doctor will clean out the sinuses with a saline solution to remove any remaining pus or bacteria.

Give Us a Call!

Minimally invasive sinus surgery is extremely effective at treating chronic sinusitis. If you are dealing with this condition, then it’s time to talk to your otolaryngologist about whether this procedure is right for you.

By Christopher J Lee, MD
June 19, 2018
Category: ENT Care

At some point in your lifetime, you may end up dealing with symptoms or issues that affect your ears, nose or throat. While some people may exhibit obvious symptoms this doesn’t mean that everyone will. Sometimes it’s difficult to know what’s going on with your ear, nose and throat health. Here are just some of the most common ENT problems and how they are addressed.

Ear Infections

This is by far the most common ENT problem that a doctor will diagnose and treat. While ear infections are more likely to develop in young children, people of all ages can develop this infection. One of the classic symptoms of an ear infection is ear pain, discharge, muffled or reduced hearing, and a red, inflamed ear. If you are experiencing an earache, it’s important that you visit your otolaryngologist. Not treating an ear infection could lead to serious long-term complications.

Sinusitis

Many people will face a sinus infection at some point during their lifetime, but most of the time it will be completely innocuous and self-limiting. Of course, you may need help managing your symptoms or making sure that the symptoms you are experiencing are truly due to a sinus infection and not something else.

While a sinus infection can easily be diagnosed just by going through the symptoms you are experiencing, we may also need to perform an endoscopy to be able to look inside the nasal passageways to determine if there is a blockage. While sinus infections will often go away on their own, there is the possibility that you may face chronic sinusitis (which lasts more than 12 weeks and doesn’t respond to self-care measure). If this happens it’s important that you turn to your doctor for help.

Strep Throat

This infection leads to painful, inflamed tonsils (the tissue in the back of the throat). While a sore throat may also be the result of a viral infection, if you are faced with a severe sore throat that doesn’t go away, it’s important that you visit an ENT doctor who can provide a proper diagnosis. Just by swabbing the back of the throat and looking for the presence of streptococcal bacteria, an ENT specialist can easily diagnose strep throat. If we detect strep throat, you will be prescribed a round of antibiotics to kill the bad bacteria.

Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a serious and potentially dangerous sleep condition that causes a person to stop breathing many times while asleep. Some people can experience hundreds of breathing cessations throughout one evening. Those with sleep apnea find themselves extremely exhausted when first waking up (even if they got enough sleep) and may struggle to get through the day. Sleep apnea can also lead to serious health issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure or stroke if left untreated. If you are a loud snorer if you wake up in the middle of the night gasping for air, if you wake up with headaches or if you find yourself feeling excessively tired throughout the day then it’s time to see a specialist.

Whether you are experiencing symptoms or you just have questions about ENT health, it’s time to turn to an otolaryngologist who can answer all of your questions and prevent, diagnose and even treat a host of ENT issues.

By Christopher J Lee, MD
March 02, 2018
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Sinusitis   Nose   Rhinoplasty  

While a nose job may seem purely cosmetic it actually offers health benefits, as well.

When we hear the words “nose job” we automatically think about the cosmetic enhancement that many people want to improve the shape and rhinoplatsyoverall appearance of their nose; however, there is more than meets the eye when it comes to a rhinoplasty. In fact, this procedure isn’t always cosmetic. Sometimes people need a rhinoplasty to improve their health. Find out when a rhinoplasty may be a necessity rather than just a cosmetic treatment.

Medical Reasons for a Rhinoplasty

One condition that may warrant getting a rhinoplasty is a birth defect known as a cleft lip or cleft palate. This congenital problem can make it challenging for children to eat or get the nutrients they require to grow up big and strong. Because of this, a rhinoplasty is often recommended by an otolaryngologist to correct the defect.

Of course, there are a multitude of conditions and injuries that may require rhinoplasty treatment. If someone has chronic nasal inflammation due to allergies and has severe breathing issues then a rhinoplasty may be the right procedure to improve their breathing.

Injuries or trauma to the nose (e.g. a broken nose) may also necessitate a rhinoplasty to correct the deformation.

Getting Rhinoplasty

Of course, no matter whether this procedure is cosmetic or medically necessary, there are two ways to perform this procedure: an open and a closed rhinoplasty. An open rhinoplasty is when the ENT doctor cuts into the septum to restructure the nose. When an incision is made into the nostrils and performed here this procedure is known as a closed rhinoplasty.

Whether you get an open or closed rhinoplasty will depend on several factors including the goals behind your treatment, any injuries or conditions you want to treat, and the thickness of the skin that we will be working on.

If you want to find out more about whether a rhinoplasty may alleviate your breathing problems then it’s time to talk to an ENT expert who can examine your nose and determine whether you are an ideal candidate.

By Christopher J Lee, MD
August 15, 2017
Category: ENT Health
Tags: Sinusitis  
SinusitisEveryone, at one time or another, has suffered from sinusitis. However, many people don’t know exactly what sinusitis is or how best to treat it; a lot of misinformation exists. Our doctors want to clear up these misunderstandings. For example, sinusitis, while often caused by the common cold, is not a cold. A cold, which is a viral infection, presents with a number of symptoms, of which sinusitis may be one.
 
Another common misconception is that sinusitis is always caused by a bacterial infection, therefore, the patient should take antibiotics immediately. However, that is not always the case.
 
In fact, many cases of sinusitis – even cases caused by bacterial infections -- don’t need to be treated with antibiotics at all. That’s why it’s important to know what is causing your sinusitis so you can properly treat it. An ENT specialist can help you determine what you are dealing with and how best to treat it.
 
In order to help better understand sinusitis, here are a few commonly asked questions and answers.

What is sinusitis?

Sinusitis is a condition that causes the cavities around your nasal passages (sinuses) to become inflamed and swollen. When this happens, it becomes more difficult for drainage to occur. This causes congestion, blockage, and tenderness.

What causes sinusitis?

Acute sinusitis is most often caused by the common cold. However, other conditions, such as allergies, bacterial and fungal infections, can cause sinusitis flare ups.

What are the symptoms?

Symptoms can include, but are not limited to: thick, yellow or green discharge; difficulty breathing through the nose; congestion; pain or tenderness around the eyes, cheeks, nose or forehead; and coughing.

How long does a typical bout of sinusitis last?

Generally, sinusitis doesn’t last more than a few days to a week or two. However, sinusitis that lasts more than eight weeks or keeps coming back is referred to as chronic sinusitis and may need more aggressive treatment. Severe cases left untreated can lead to more serious complications.

What are my treatment options?

Treatment will depend on the individual case, but most of the time most cases can be treated with over the counter/home remedies. More severe bacterial infections might require antibiotics.
 
If you are seeking the services of an experienced ENT doctor, consider contacting our office for an appointment.
 
If you have irritating allergies, you already know they can affect your life. They can keep you from doing the things you like, and worst of all, they may not be just seasonal. But now there’s help just a phone call away from your ENT specialists. Call today and get some relief from your allergies!